When students hear the word “sex-ed”, they often tend to tag a belittling label to the concept itself as a program where students tease about learning about human anatomy and the basics of sexual intercourse. The sex-ed program in KIS hasn’t been taken much seriously, mainly because the unit taught in PE teaches students on a more scientific level of the concepts related to sex education.

Although learning the scientific side of sex education is important, more genuine content and concepts are required to be taught in order for students to effectively utilize such knowledge in “real-world” situations because things don’t also go by the book in real life. For quite some time, we, as a KIS community, have neglected the magnitude of importance the content students can learn and benefit from in such programs. However, such indifferent attitude has changed this year.

Starting this semester, KIS has introduced a brand new unit in PE: “Life After KIS”. This program is designed to inform students not only about sex education, but also about other crucial life skills to handle risky situations such as how to stay safe during college parties, and about drug usage in particular. Our school has had a sex-ed program in past years, but the majority of students would agree that they haven’t gotten much “real” content out of the unit. And so, this new program aims to help students receive genuine advice and necessary knowledge to stay safe as well as make more informed decisions about their sexual life. According to Mr. Lunardo, the program is mainly focused on educating students about sexually transmitted diseases, refusal techniques, consent, and drug usage.

The PE classes have done refusal skits to in order to reenact risky situations where sexual behavior may or may not take action with or without consent. Students say that they had a fun time preparing and performing the skit, but it also helped them grasp a stronger sense of realization that those situations occur often in reality. Other than the skit, the students performed quizzes and generated a question box in order to learn more about the possible diseases and about drugs.

Even though the program is new to KIS, students were optimistic about the changes made. “[The unit] moves past the anatomy of sexual intercourse,” says Claire Min (10). “It now also focuses on how to ensure students stay safe during sexual activity and also with drug usage.”

It seems that there is a relatively positive outlook on the program. “Life After KIS” has been a big step forward for our school because it is crucial to give adolescents an accurate picture of the risks of different types of consequences from sexual behavior and drug usage. The hope is that the implementation of this new program will truly be effective in helping students with situations and making informed decisions during their high school and more importantly after they graduate and move onto their college experience.

It seems that there is a relatively positive outlook on the program. “Life After KIS” has been a big step forward for our school because it is crucial to give adolescents an accurate picture of the risks of different types of consequences from sexual behavior and drug usage. The hope is that the implementation of this new program will truly be effective in helping students with situations and making informed decisions during their high school and more importantly after they graduate and move onto their college experience.

– Sophie Yang (’21)

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